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Scot-Buzz editor BILL JAMIESON looks ahead to the Smith Commission, set up to 'facilitate an inclusive engagement process across Scotland'. More powers. All Lord Smith had to do was 'create a process through which politicians, civic institutions and the Scottish public can come together, work together and agree the detail of what those powers should be'. Good luck with that says Bill. Mission Braveheart or Mission Absurd?
This week we look at the fall-out from Kent and that little indiscretion - a tweet and three flags too far. We wonder at the Glasgow rallies and the Totty Rocks, and how the new boys and girls will measure up. There's a new kid on the block, but an old one looks like leaving. More powers. More tax. A dream turns sour, there's small town footie, the beginning of a traffic jam, and we bid farewell to a Scottish icon...
KEN HOUSTON wonders if the 45 - the Yessers - are really entering into the spirit of the referendum result or just building up for a re-run. He takes a sideways and sceptical look at plans to turn Prestwick airport into a spaceport - what'll rocket launches do for house prices? And should the SNP's swelling membership move their next conference south to Blackpool? What a good idea, says Ken...
JOHN MCGURK is stunned. A new daily paper for Scotland at a time when print sales have never been lower. It's either the work of a genius or someone was let out for the weekend. The National hopes to build a readership from the 1.6 million who voted Yes in the referendum campaign. Is it a genuine attempt to produce a newspaper in tune with Scotland's modern politics, John wonders, or just a desperate bid to cash in on the independence surge?
GEORGE KEREVAN, our Columnist At Large, scores the first edition of Scotland’s new newspaper. He's encouraged by the contributions of the new generation of journalists, who emerged during the fierce and frenetic reporting of the referendum, but it could do better in its world news. And do big pictures mean less copy? All in all, George thinks this could have legs - and gives it a starter of 8/10.
TELL US MORE - Each week in this column Scot-Buzz tells Scotland about your businesses, events and conferences . So do you have a new product/service about to launch? An event to promote? A conference or meeting date for the diary? Send the details to bill@scot-buzz.co.uk marked ‘attention notice board’. Here's this week's round up...
Move over Black Friday. Scot-Buzz has proof that Christmas really is getting earlier each year. Black Friday - when online retailers step up their marketing blitz and you start serious spending – is usually followed by Cyber Monday the following week. But this year it's already kicked off, to become Cyber Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. And, by the weekend you’ll be out for the count for the big one - Sofa Sunday.
Office Christmas parties – how do they still survive? If health and safety hasn’t seen them off, or austerity cost-cutting, alcohol intake policing, divorce filing or horrendous morning-after embarrassment, the taxman could now deliver the coup de grace… There’s nothing more likely to kill off office party cheer than a nasty tax assessment in the New Year, so take heed now. Think Scrooge. Think small. Think fun? Bah, humbug...
ROBERT KELSEY marvels at the ingenuity of the entrepreneurs he's come across and the innovation they thrive on. But delving deeper, he came to realise that innovation often comes from dealing with what we dislike or even hate, from what angers or irritates us - I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to do it this way any longer...
RUTH MCKAY says we often only hear about young entrepreneurs when they’ve hit the headlines and achieved some level of success. But there's a huge growth in the numbers of under-35s starting up since 2006. A profound cultural shift is taking place, says Ruth, inspired by popular programmes such as Dragon’s Den and the Apprentice. We need to build on it...
Scot-Buzz editor BILL JAMIESON finds the silver lining behind the falling oil price cloud. $90 and falling, then $80 and still falling: the price of Brent crude has now sunk to $78.74 a barrel. A temporary blip? The 29-country International Energy Agency believes we are seeing a major step change in the price. Economic disaster? Not for motorists, says Bill, or those in fuel poverty, or businesses...